Army scientist making waves in quantum technology

November 17, 2017

By Jenna Brady, ARL Public Affairs

Story Highlights

  • ARL materials scientist Dr. Elizabeth Goldschmidt was recently invited to share her perspective on an article published in the journal Science.
  • In addition to this perspective, Goldschmidt also recently had a paper published in Physical Review A.
  • Her research and work will play a central role in developing the future quantum information systems and networks that will allow robust and secure communications, sensing and information processing beyond what is possible with purely classical technologies

ADELPHI, Md. (Nov. 17, 2017) – An Army materials scientist was recently invited to share her perspective on an article published in the journal Science.

Dr. Elizabeth Goldschmidt, a scientist at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, offered her perspective on an article written by a group at the California Institute of Technology titled "Storing light in a tiny box," which discusses demonstrating quantum memory using rare-earth atoms in a solid-state nanostructured photonic crystal cavity.

"The editors of Science invite commentary from experts in the field, in the form of perspectives like this one, on particularly high impact research articles," Goldschmidt said. "I was thrilled to be given the opportunity to co-author this perspective with Professor Edo Waks at the University of Maryland on a research article that is very exciting for the field of quantum memory and quantum networks."

In the perspective, Goldschmidt and Waks discuss recent work by the group of Andrei Faraon at Caltech studying quantum memory in a nanophotonic system of rare-earth atoms.

"Implementing reliable quantum memories is an important step toward building a quantum network," Goldschmidt said. "The Army is interested in quantum networks because of the promise they hold for secure communication as well as distributed quantum sensing and quantum information processing."

According to Goldschmidt, implementing a quantum memory protocol in a chip-scale device, as was done by the Caltech group, is important for moving toward scalable, integrated photonics approaches to quantum networking.

The goal is to eventually integrate quantum light sources, detectors and light-matter interfaces (like quantum memory) in a compact, scalable design.

"My research at ARL is in developing quantum memories in similar systems of rare-earth atoms in solids, and so I am particularly interested in the research we discussed in our perspective," Goldschmidt said.

In addition to this perspective, Goldschmidt also recently had a paper published in Physical Review A.

The paper, titled "Temporal and spectral manipulations of correlated photons using a time lens," demonstrates a method for improving detection of entangled photons when the photons are too difficult to resolve with available single photon detectors.

Entangled photons are the basis for many quantum information systems, but the speed of available single photon detection systems is outstripped by that of available entangled photon sources and photonic systems.

A time lens allows general reshaping of the temporal and spectral envelope of a multi-photon state, and in particular allows detection of temporal features beyond the resolution of the detector.

The work is done in collaboration with the Joint Quantum Institute.

"Studying quantum optical systems, like those highlighted here, is vitally important," Goldschmidt said. "These types of tools will play a central role in developing the future quantum information systems and networks that will allow robust and secure communications, sensing and information processing beyond what is possible with purely classical technologies."


The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, currently celebrating 25 years of excellence in Army science and technology, is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: November 17, 2017