50th Anniversary Celebration: 46th Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference on Advances and Needs in Multi-Spectral Transparent Materials Technology

Report No. ARL-SR-0164
Authors: James M. Sands and James W. McCauley
Date/Pages: September 2008; 170 pages
Abstract: and academia for in-depth discussions of cutting edge materials technology issues of critical importance to the U.S. Army community. The 46th Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference continued this tradition with a focus on "Advances and Needs in Multi-Spectral Transparent Materials Technology." Held at the Harbourtowne Golf Resort and Conference Center, St. Michaels, MD, on May 9-12, 2005, the objective of this conference was to review the applications, requirements, and major technical barriers of multi-spectral transparent materials for sensor protection, ground and air vehicle ballistic protection, personnel protection, and infrastructure survivability. The conference proceedings, documented in this report, included presentation media along with selected papers and supporting content that highlight the performance and capabilities requirements of the embedded Army systems in Current and Future Forces. The multi-spectral transparent materials technology needs include transparent armor, phased array radar, displays, electromagnetic windows and domes, and polycrystalline lasers. The presentations focus on processing, characterization, property testing, and system requirements of advanced ceramic and polymer systems to enable the cost-effective manufacturing of high quality, reproducible materials for these applications. These proceedings demonstrate both the effective communication of critical technology needs within the industrial community as well as continued opportunities for advancement of these technologies for military applications.
Distribution: Approved for public release
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Last Update / Reviewed: September 1, 2008