Army researcher wins competition

January 10, 2018

By ARL Public Affairs

Story Highlights

  • ARL researcher Jeffrey Pawlick recently won first place in the Three-Minute Thesis Competition at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Global Signal and Information Processing conference
  • Pawlick studies cyber-physical systems security and has published research that studies the security of autonomous vehicles, cloud-connected insulin pumps and power grids subject to load injection attacks carried out by botnets of Internet of things devices

ADELPHI, Md. (Jan. 10, 2018) -- An Army researcher from the U.S. Army Research laboratory recently received first place in the three-minute thesis competition at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Global Signal and Information Processing conference.

Jeffrey Pawlick, an ARL journeyman fellow, accepted the award last month in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Participants in the competition put their doctoral research into three minute presentations, using one presentation slide. Participants are challenged to present the research in a clear, concise way in order to capture the attention of a non-expert audience.

Pawlick studies cyber-physical systems security with Dr. Edward Colbert within the laboratory's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate.

He plans to obtain his doctorate in electrical engineering from New York University's Center for Cybersecurity, under advisor Professor Quanyan Zhu.

"When I started my doctorate, my advisor suggested that I study cybersecurity," Pawlick said. "But I didn't like programming. I wanted to do control theory, to study dynamic systems."

Pawlick has published research that studied the security of autonomous vehicles, cloud-connected insulin pumps and power grids subject to load injection attacks. His work at ARL focuses on the use of game theory to quantify the potential of proactive security techniques that use defensive deception.

Pawlick said he is grateful for the opportunity to direct his research towards the needs of the Army.

"When I started studying cybersecurity, my research was motivated by the intellectual challenges involved," he said. "But now, after spending several months at ARL, I realize that it is also about protecting people's lives."


The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to ensure decisive overmatch for unified land operations to empower the Army, the joint warfighter and our nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: January 10, 2018