West elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

March 15, 2013

Story Highlights

  • Dr. Bruce West, senior scientist of mathematics and information science at the U.S Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) Army Research Office and ARL Fellow, was recently elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
  • Founded in 1848, AAAS is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing science around the world by serving as an educator, leader, spokesperson and professional association.
  • Election as an AAAS Fellow honors AAAS members whose efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its application in service to society have distinguished them among their peers and colleagues. Fellows are elected annually by the AAAS Council.

Dr. Bruce West, senior scientist of mathematics and information science at the U.S Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) Army Research Office and ARL Fellow, was recently elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Founded in 1848, AAAS is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing science around the world by serving as an educator, leader, spokesperson and professional association.

Election as an AAAS Fellow honors AAAS members whose efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its application in service to society have distinguished them among their peers and colleagues. Fellows are elected annually by the AAAS Council.

Areas in which nominees have made significant contributions include research, teaching, technology, services to professional societies, administration in academe, industry and government, and communicating and interpreting science to the public.

"The American Association for the Advancement of Science is a unique organization in part because it is not associated with a specific discipline. This is evident to anyone that has ever attended an AAAS conference and found themselves at a talk with an audience consisting of sociologists, biologists, psychologists, physicians, and physicists. You can identify them by the kinds of questions they ask and what they accept as explanations," said West.

West noted that it is this scientific breadth that makes receiving this award all the more sweet.

"The award does not come from scientists in my own discipline who I have known for years and who I might suspect nominated me out of friendship. This award means that the research I have been involved in has received recognition beyond my immediate scientific discipline and that is a source of great satisfaction," stated West.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: March 15, 2013