West Point's newest faculty tour ARL

August 28, 2013

Story Highlights

  • The U.S. Army Research Laboratory at the Adelphi Laboratory Center and Aberdeen Proving Ground recently hosted 21 new faculty members from the United States Military Academy at West Point for a tour around the organization's various directorates and laboratories.
  • The group was briefed on ARL's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate and Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate in areas including current operations, antennas, autonomous systems, microscale modeling, cyber security and the nano-nuclear magnetic resonance facility.
  • On the second day of the tour at APG, the faculty members were given overviews of ARL's Human Resources and Engineering Directorate, Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate and Vehicle Technology Directorate.

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) at the Adelphi Laboratory Center (ALC) and Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) recently hosted 21 new faculty members from the United States Military Academy at West Point for a tour around the organization's various directorates and laboratories.

On the first day of the tour at ALC, Len Huskey, associate for corporate programs, gave an overview of ARL to the new faculty members; where he noted the importance of the laboratory's mission to discover, innovate and transition science and technology, in order to make today's and tomorrow's Army obsolete.

The group was then briefed on ARL's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD) and Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate (SEDD) in areas including current operations, antennas, autonomous systems, microscale modeling, cyber security and nano-nuclear magnetic resonance.

"It is critical that ARL interacts with the Soldier," said Dr. Steven Weiss of ARL's Antennas and RF Technology Integration Branch within SEDD, who spoke to the group about current and future research involving antennas and their support to Soldiers on the battlefield. "Tours such as this provide an important feedback opportunity and give us a reality check that ensures the direction of our research will meet the future needs of our troops."

Weiss said that the personal interaction is what makes tours such as this most enjoyable, and that very frequently, he and his colleagues obtain valuable suggestions on practical problems their work needs to address.

"Additionally, we obtain important contact information with Army personnel at other locations that are searching for answers to Army problems. This can frequently end up with us taking site visits to various bases for more detailed briefings on the Soldier's needs," added Weiss.

On the second day of the tour at APG, the faculty members were given overviews of ARL's Human Resources and Engineering Directorate (HRED), Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD), Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) and Vehicle Technology Directorate (VTD) in areas such as cognitive assessment, simulation engineering, tactical environment simulation, communications survivability assessment, electronic warfare, communications modeling and simulation, ceramic processing, dynamic deformation analysis of fabrics and composites, combustion, and prognostics and diagnostics.

"Hosting tours, such as the USMA new faulty tour, is imperative because it provides ARL with various opportunities to demonstrate to military, academia and industry leaders its expertise in developing technologies that directly support the Army's mission," said Jason Gregory, computer engineer in CISD's Asset Control and Behavior Branch, who demonstrated current research in autonomous systems to the group.

"These tours also bring to light the superior level of dedication and innovation that ARL employees embody, which ultimately helps lead to future collaborations and the advancement of science," added Gregory.

The faculty members were highly engaged in the tour, asking questions to researchers when the topics addressed peaked their interest.

Some of the group members mentioned that they really did not know very much about ARL before the tour, but that after receiving overviews of the different research being conducted at each facility, they were very much impressed and interested in contacting specialists in their particular fields for more detailed information.

For Gregory, the most enjoyable aspect of showcasing ARL technology to outside organizations is the instant feedback he and his colleagues receive that confirms the relevancy of their efforts.

"By having in-person interactions with potential partners, we often times gain a better understanding of how our research will make an impact through real-world applications. And the impressed facial expressions from members of the audience are a close second," stated Gregory.


ARL is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to develop technology and engineering solutions for America's Soldiers.

RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command. AMC is the Army's premier provider of materiel readiness-technology, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projection and sustainment-to the total force, across the spectrum of joint military operations. If a Soldier shoots it, drives it, flies it, wears it, eats it or communicates with it, AMC provides it.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: August 28, 2013