U.S. Army Research Laboratory welcomes new Sergeant Major

July 11, 2017

By Tracie R. Dean, ARL Public Affairs

Story Highlights

  • The U.S. Army Research Laboratory recently welcomed Sgt. Maj. Keith Noland Taylor as the laboratory's new sergeant major.
  • As the senior noncommissioned officer at ARL, Taylor succeeds Master Sgt. Richard M. Socia who served in this military position since the fall of 2015.
  • Taylor's military career totals more than 29 years and includes overseas duty in Korea and Germany. He has also deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. His experience and career fields include: communications, infantry, recruitment, field artillery, air defense, sustainment and cyber.

ADELPHI, Md. (June 23, 2017) -- The U.S. Army Research Laboratory recently welcomed Sgt. Maj. Keith Noland Taylor as the laboratory's new sergeant major.

As the senior noncommissioned officer at ARL, Taylor succeeds Master Sgt. Richard M. Socia who served in this military position since the fall of 2015. Taylor's military career totals more than 29 years and includes overseas duty in Korea and Germany. He has also deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. His experience and career fields include: communications, infantry, recruitment, field artillery, air defense, sustainment, and cyber.

"I am extremely excited to be working at ARL and look forward to working with Soldiers and civilians," Taylor said.

For Taylor, being a Sergeant Major in today's U.S. Army comes with the knowledge that you are a mentor and a role model at all times. "Being a Sergeant Major is an awesome responsibility," Taylor said, "It means you are the center of influence and a mentor to the Soldiers and civilians around you. You are the epitome of what a noncommissioned officer is and should represent a sterling example of professionalism that should be maintained at all times."

And while he is just beginning to better understand the research, technology, and development missions of the ARL, Taylor is already adapting ways to use his broad military experience and help find ways to enhance the support that Soldiers provide at ARL.

"First, I would like to say thank you to the Soldier for your service," Taylor said.

Taylor then transitioned the conversation to address the strong bond and commitment to ARL's mission that he has already observed between Army civilians and their military counterparts at ARL.

"Many times, civilians don't hear how much of an impact their work has on Soldiers," Taylor explained. "Every civilian plays a role in saving Soldier's lives. Both the decisions they make and the technologies they design saves lives.

"While I chose to serve my nation as a Soldier, civilians and contractors serve the country as well in a different venue and I appreciate that," Taylor reflected.

"Until recently, I had no significant knowledge of ARL," Taylor said. "That's what makes this assignment so rewarding. It is an opportunity to offer the skills that I have learned (elsewhere) and translate them to the scientists and researchers (at ARL)."

Taylor plans to spend his initial time at ARL finding ways to meet ARL personnel and learning more about the ARL missions that support the Warfighters.

"I plan to conduct initial site visits to the U.S. Army Research Office, ARL's White Sands Missile Range, ARL West and other laboratories and centers across the Army spectrum," Taylor said. "That will be time well spent. I also look forward to meeting with both military and civilian leadership to discuss current capabilities and will bring that information back to ARL leadership to implement changes for improvements."

Taylor earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Management from Franklin University and Master of Science Degree in Management and Leadership from Webster University. His military education includes the battle staff NCO course, basic instructor course and all levels of the noncommissioned officer education system. He is also a graduate of the Army Sergeants Major Academy.

Special awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (2 OLC), Meritorious Service Medal (4 OLC), Army Commendation Medal (3 OLC) and the Army Achievement Medal (6 OLC).


The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, currently celebrating 25 years of excellence in Army science and technology, is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: July 11, 2017