West Point cadets, military scientists highlight collaboration at tech symposium

November 30, 2010

Dr. Kim Pollard takes questions from West Point cadets about ARL's bone conduction technology research, which allows people to hear from vibrations in the bones rather than from their ears during the ARL/USMA Tech Symposium. Dr. Kim Pollard takes questions from West Point cadets about ARL's bone conduction technology research, which allows people to hear from vibrations in the bones rather than from their ears during the ARL/USMA Tech Symposium.

West Point cadets and military scientists converged Nov. 8 and 9 in Atlantic City, N.J., at the 18th annual U.S. Army Research Laboratory/U.S. Military Academy Technical Symposium.

Every year West Point cadets and faculty along with Army scientists showcase their independent and collaborative research projects through presentations and posters displays. Dozens of cadets come to ARL sites to perform internship-like research projects during the summer.

"This is the culmination of the hard work cadets put in over the year and in Army labs," said ARL Director John Miller, kicking off the event.

About 100 people attended the event, said Maj. Anthony Johnson, director of Mathematical Sciences Center of Excellence at USMA and event organizer.

As an educator, he said the symposium is important because it creates well-rounded Army leaders and gives them tools to think critically.

"The idea is that they will become scholar-warriors," said Johnson. "If there's a problem on the battlefield, they'll think like a scholar and know the research process."

ARL's Luis Hernandez explains the language translation technologies being tested at ARL to the West Point cadets at the ARL/USMA Tech Symposium. ARL's Luis Hernandez explains the language translation technologies being tested at ARL to the West Point cadets at the ARL/USMA Tech Symposium.

Knowing the scientific process for military research will become ever more important as the U.S. Army becomes even more technologically advanced.

"You are in a high-tech Army that will be even more so in the future," said Miller to the cadets

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With many of the cadets facing many years of military service, understanding the direction of research that's happening at ARL now will be helpful for them in the future careers since most of what they learn about will affect the Warfighter anywhere from five to 15 years down the road, said Miller.

While cadets learn about military research, perform projects and receive mentorship from the ARL staff, the laboratory also benefits from the insights of the up and coming Army leaders.

"It's important for the labs that you (cadets) come and spend time with us," said Miller. "You 19 to 22 year-olds are pushing us. It's always great to get your influence."

 

Last Update / Reviewed: November 30, 2010