Modeling and simulation award presented to ARL's Simulation and Training Technology Center

January 10, 2012

Story Highlights

  • National Training and Simulation Association recently held leadership reception and executive dinner.
  • 2011 Governor's Award received by ARL STTC Multiple Amputation Trauma Trainer (MATT) headed by Dr. Teresita Sotomayor.
  • More than 4,000 American Warfighters have been trained using the MATT simulations.

ORLANDO, FL - Each year, the National Training and Simulation Association (NTSA) presents awards for outstanding achievement in Modeling and Simulation at its annual NTSA leadership reception and executive dinner. This year's event was held Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011, in conjunction with Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference 2011. The most outstanding nominee, selected from the pool of the NTSA Modeling and Simulation Award winners, received the 2011 Governor's Award.

Awards are given in the following categories: Training, Analysis, Acquisition, Cross-Function (multiple uses), and Individual/Lifetime Achievement. This year's overall award winner was the U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Simulation and Training Technology Center (STTC) Multiple Amputation Trauma Trainer (MATT) headed by Dr. Teresita Sotomayor, S&T Manager, Medical Simulation Technologies, STTC, which is based in Orlando, Fla.

Sotomayor and her team conceived and designed an innovative training solution that provides exceptional engineering, testing and program management leadership that significantly contributes to the preparedness of Soldiers during pre-deployment training by improving the realism and clinical accuracy of severe trauma simulations.

More than 4,000 American Warfighters have been trained using the MATT simulations located worldwide throughout the joint medical and combat communities.

"Hemorrhage control is the most important life saving skill in battlefield trauma medicine," said Sotomayor.

According to Sotomayor, the MATT program introduces animatronics technology into Army medical simulations for the first time. The program incorporated movement and special effects technologies to significantly increase realism and Soldier immersion during combat scenario-based training addressing a current gap in hemorrhage control training.

"The system has improved the effectiveness of both military and civilian trauma training. The system also improves treatment performance, which saves lives and limbs. Additional benefits are realized by desensitizing medics to the emotional effects of experiencing the sight, feel, and movement of severe casualties," said Sotomayor.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: January 10, 2012