Portable Electronic Device (PED) Information

Purpose

This document is meant to inform visitors and guest researchers to ARL of the authorized use of PED's and removable media within ARL. This document should be distributed to all incoming visitors and guest researchers prior to their arrival to ensure they are familiar with the ARL PED policy.

Definition

A PED is defined in Army Regulation (AR) 25-2 as portable Information Systems (IS) or devices with the capability of wireless or LAN connectivity. These include, but are not limited to: laptop computers with wireless capabilities, cellular/personal communication system devices, audio/video/data recording or playback devices, scanning devices, remote sensors, messaging devices, personal digital assistants (PDAs) (for example, Blackberries, Palm Pilots, Pocket PCs), and two-way radios. This policy addresses government and contractor PEDs issued and owned, as well as personally owned devices.

Requirements

  • At no time will non-U.S. Citizens be allowed to use PEDs within ARL.
  • PED's issued and approved by a U.S. Government agency should have documentation that a PED is approved. A memorandum from the government agency's information assurance office will be used to show compliance with either the NIACAP or DITSCAP requirement.
  • If a non-government issued PED is required and it does not include the capabilities identified below it may be allowed with notification to the ARL IAM and Security offices at PED@arl.army.mil
    • Photographic
    • Wireless
    • Audio/Video recording
    • Web enabled
  • If a laptop is required and it is not appropriately accredited by a government agency, then that laptop must be reviewed prior to acceptance. This review may include an anti-virus, host configuration, and/or a network based scan. If this is not properly coordinated prior to arrival it is possible the resources may not be available.
  • Web enabled cell phones will be treated the same as laptops and will be subject to the requirements described above.
 

Last Update / Reviewed: March 1, 2011