Kinetic Protection

Kinetic Protection concentrates on technologies capable of sufficiently degrading, redirecting, or defeating the kinetic energy of objects, particles, or sets of particles from causing lethal effects.

Modeling of Dynamic Failure at Extreme States

Discover the underlying mechanisms associated with material transformations/instabilities that occur at very high loading rates, pressures, temperatures, and magnetic fields; create engineering-level models of the underlying mechanisms, and structure the models in a manner consistent for implementation into advanced computational mechanics codes.  Academic Disciplines: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, and Physics.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Muge Fermen-Coker muge.fermen-coker.civ@mail.mil 410-278-6018

Modeling of Dynamic Fracture

Discover the underlying mechanisms associated with material fracture and failure that occur at very high loading rates, create engineering-level models of the underlying mechanisms, and structure the models in a manner consistent for implementation into advanced computational mechanics codes.  Academic Disciplines: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, and Physics.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Richard Becker richard.c.becker.civ@mail.mil 410-278-7980

Modeling Development and Validation via Novel Experimental Diagnostics

This work encompasses fundamental research in electromagnetism and solid mechanics. A close synergism between theory and experiment is continuously sought, and close collaboration between experimentalists and modelers is considered mandatory. The theoretical work can vary from largely analytical, which relies only on physics-based PC programs, to full-scale hydrocode simulations. The experimental work employs sophisticated diagnostics that can be used to measure electrical and thermodynamic properties for purposes of comparison with theory.  Specific research projects in electrodynamics or plasma physics with an emphasis on conductors moving in electromagnetic fields, gasses under extreme conditions, and/or development of unique experimental diagnostics for physics-based model or hydrocode validation.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Willard (Casey) Uhlig willard.c.uhlig.civ@mail.mil 410-278-3997

High-Rate Experimental Mechanics of Materials at Different Length Scales and Loading Rates

Exploring and understanding the relationship between response of materials (metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials, fiber/thin-film, fabric, fiber-composite, bio tissue/cell) to rate-dependent mechanical loading by identifying associated micro-mechanisms through quantitative in-situ visualization. Investigations are designed to unravel the deformation, failure/injury mechanisms at loading rates and length scales with focus on Army-relevant materials including bio and bio-surrogate materials.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Tusit Weerasooriya tusit.weerasooriya.civ@mail.mil 410-306-0969

Humans in Extreme Environments

Understanding the mechanisms of human response to high-rate ballistic loading. Develop experimental methods and computational techniques to understand the human response to ballistic loading. Current research focuses include understanding the response of the brain and the body to ballistic-loading conditions including accelerative loading. Experimental investigations in the response of the brain are designed to elucidate neuronal responses from mechanical loading at different rates. Computational techniques are required to accurately represent the rate-dependent response of tissue to applied loading.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Christopher Hoppel christopher.p.hoppel.civ@mail.mil 410-278-8878

Understanding the Mechanisms of Traumatic Brain Injury

Develop in situ experimental methods to characterize the neuronal response to different rates of loading including ballistic loading. Develop computational techniques to represent the electrical, mechanical, and chemical responses of the brain to stress waves applied to the body.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Christopher Hoppel christopher.p.hoppel.civ@mail.mil 410-278-8878

Computational Methods for Humans and Surrogate Models

Develop numerical methods to capture hierarchy of tissue organization bridging length scales and multi-physics response. Develop models and algorithms for tissue injury, such as bone fracture, vasculature damage, and diffuse axonal injury. Develop computational tools to seamlessly process imaging data, produce solid models, and discretize into robust computational models for analysis. Develop analysis tools to capture biovariability.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Sikhanda Satapathy sikhanda.s.satapathy.civ@mail.mil 410-278-8565

Deformation and Failure Mechanisms for Army-Relevant Materials

Understanding the relationship between mechanical, electrical, and chemical response of materials at different length scales to rate-dependent mechanical loading with focus on rates experienced by Soldiers on the battlefield. Develop of in situ experimental methods and conduct investigations to identify associated micro-mechanisms through quantitative visualization.

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Tusit Weerasooriya tusit.weerasooriya.civ@mail.mil 410-306-0969

Enhanced Prediction of Skeletal Injury Risk Due to Under-Body Blast (UBB)

The Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan) project is developing a new, scientifically valid capability to assess the probability of skeletal injury to occupants of ground vehicles subjected to the effects of an under-body blast (UBB) event such as a Live-Fire test. The project will produce new biomechanics knowledge and an anthropomorphic test device (ATD) designed to have human-like response to vertical, high-energy, high-acceleration conditions. A vast amount of biomechanics test data can be leveraged for test purposes.

The WIAMan Accelerative Loading Fixture (ALF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground is designed to generate predictable and repeatable UBB-loading conditions to simulated vehicle occupants, both for non-injurious and injurious testing. The ALF, with surrounding facilities at the Fuze Range and Experimental Facility 10 (EF-10), provides a unique biomechanics research and test capability for post-mortem human surrogate (PMHS) and anthropomorphic test device (ATD) experiments.

Principal Investigators:

Mr. Frederick J. Hughes frederick.j.hughes2.civ@mail.mil 410-278-9046