ARL researcher recognized for work in robotics and automation

July 21, 2015

By Joyce M. Conant, ARL Public Affairs

Story Highlights

  • ARL researcher appointed to be an associate editor of the IEEE Robotics and Automation – Letters
  • Human-agent teaming research can benefit Soldiers by making their interaction with intelligent systems more effective and intuitive
  • ARL researcher has conceptualized an agent transparency model that is currently being tested

Dr. Jessie Y.C. Chen, a senior research psychologist at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Human Research and Engineering Directorate in Orlando, Florida, was appointed to be an associate editor of the IEEE Robotics and Automation – Letters, which is a new journal the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society launched this summer.

Raja Chatila, president of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, said the appointment was because of Dr. Chen's standing in the field of robotics and automation and added that one of the major motivations behind the new journal was to provide the robotics community an efficient channel for publishing high quality peer-reviewed articles.

Chen began her federal career at the U.S. Army Research Institute and joined ARL in 2003. At ARL, she conducts research on human-robot interaction and human-autonomy teaming, specifically in the area of agent transparency.

When asked how she got interested in this line of work, she said, "It started shortly after I joined ARL when I worked on the Human-Robot Interaction Program. My current agent transparency research is a follow-on effort to the 2009-2010 ARL Director's Research Initiative project 'RoboLeader.'"

Chen said her goal is to support the Soldier to make his or her job easier.

"Systems (unmanned and otherwise) are becoming increasingly intelligent and are gradually playing teammate roles to Soldiers. Human-agent teaming research can benefit Soldiers by making their interaction with intelligent systems more effective and intuitive," said Chen. "We are currently working on two projects funded by the Office of Secretary of Defense's Autonomy Research Pilot Initiative, and we conceptualized an agent transparency model that we are currently testing in our projects. We hope to produce a set of user interface design guidelines based on our research results."

Chen is actively involved in the research community and frequently serves as a reviewer for several leading scientific journals and a program committee member for technical conferences. She is also a member of a NATO research task group on human-autonomy teaming.

Born and raised in Taiwan, Chen came to the United States almost 30 years ago for grad school and has stayed since. The married mother of two adult sons (who are both in graduate school) and wife of an engineering professor, said that outside of work she enjoys Taichi, line dance and Zumba – she also said she loves reading novels and biographies.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: July 21, 2015