Army researcher earns lifetime achievement award

March 08, 2016

By ARL Public Affairs

Story Highlights

  • A materials scientist with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory received the 2015 Ralph P.I. Adler Award for Lifetime Achievement
  • Brian Placzankis has been an active contributor and leader in the Army's corrosion program

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Feb. 29, 2016) – A materials scientist with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory received the 2015 Ralph P.I. Adler Award for Lifetime Achievement. Brian Placzankis, received the honor for his work in the DOD Corrosion Community.

As Weapons and Materials Research Directorate Corrosion and Surface Science Team lead, Placzankis has been an active contributor and leader in the Army's corrosion program. He's led corrosion research programs beyond service boundaries and been a technical contributor and member of the organizing committee of the DOD and Allied Nations Corrosion Conference.

The Ralph P.I. Adler award recognizes long-term service to the DOD Corrosion Conference and DOD corrosion prevention and control community by an active or retired military member, civil servant, contractor or member of academia.

"I was more than a bit shocked at first at being singled out and selected for this honor given the outstanding group of colleagues within the rest of the Army and our other services that I have had the great pleasure of learning from and working with over the many years," Placzankis said.

A committee staffed by members from each service and the Office of the Secretary of Defense selected Placzankis for the honor. Placzankis validated and transitioned sustainable corrosion-resistant alloys for land and marine applications with improved structural and ballistic response and improved manufacturability for platform use and has led various programs in sustainable corrosion mitigation strategies for alloys, welds, fasteners and munitions.

DOD and academic corrosion scientists partnered in 2007 when the DOD Corrosion Office formed the University Corrosion Collaboration, a Congressionally supported effort, which led to the formation of a consortium known as the Technical Corrosion Collaboration, or TCC.

According to the nomination, Placzankis established a "legacy of research through his influence on graduate students through the TCC and establishment of a thriving corrosion team that focuses on fundamental corrosion research through technology transition to directly benefit the DOD and the warfighter."

Placzankis said what drives him to do the best and go beyond expectations is his commitment to American service members.

"I will continue on with what I currently enjoy the most, transitioning better materials to make our warfighters' missions less difficult and our weapons platforms more effective. The less they need to worry about their weapons and equipment degrading or falling apart due to corrosion or inferior materials, the more effective they can be," he said. "To do any less for them would be unthinkable."

Placzankis received the award Nov. 19, 2015, during the DOD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference.

 

Last Update / Reviewed: March 8, 2016